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Remnants of the submerged forest and peat beds at Borth, Ceredigion (Picture courtesy of Geoff Duller, CHERISH Project).
Patrick Robson

Tirweddau coll – Cipolwg ar y gorffennol a rhybudd ar gyfer y dyfodol!

The future impacts of climate change – accelerated by human activity – are now widely reported, discussed and largely acknowledged.  All the evidence indicates there will be an increase in the intensity of the earth’s weather systems leading to enhanced storminess, more droughts and flooding, enhanced melting of glaciers and icecaps, and an increase in global sea-levels.  Yet somehow the implications for us personally can often seem remote and difficult to visualise.  However, the Welsh coastline offers us the opportunity to look into the past to see that rising sea-levels are not a new phenomenon.  Dotted around the Welsh and

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Edward Pollard

Caer Rosslare: yn nannedd y storm ac ymchwydd y tonnau

Introduction A village once stood at the mouth of Wexford Harbour, guarding the entrance, fishing, and rescuing people wrecked on the sand banks offshore. Today, the buildings of this settlement known as Rosslare Fort are marked by dispersed broken stone

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Alison James

Bronze Bell Wreck Dive

Bronze Bell Wreck Dive Bronze Bell Wreck Dive Filming dive diaries, looking out to the Bronze Bell site. CHERISH have commissioned MSDS Marine to undertake inspection, survey, investigation, recording and monitoring of the Bronze Bell wreck, a previously monitored and designated

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cyCY